Products

Do I Really Need a Grab Bar?

A closer look at grab bars, how they prevent falls, and why they carry so much stigma
Micah Rakoff Bellman  ·
January 11, 2021  ·
6 minute read
Share.
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share.
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest

Do I really need a grab bar?

If you don’t need a grab bar right now, you probably will at some point—and that’s okay! The reality of being human is that we all experience changes to our mobility eventually. Installing grab bars before you need them will reduce your safety risks long-term.

What is a grab bar?

Before we go further into the why of grab bars, we need to know what we’re talking about. 

A lot of dictionary definitions of grab bars are tied specifically to bathrooms—but grab bars can be useful in a lot more spaces.  

We liked this definition from Wikipedia, because it takes a broader approach:

“Grab bars are safety devices designed to enable a person to maintain balance, lessen fatigue while standing, hold some of their weight while maneuvering, or have something to grab onto in case of a slip or fall. A caregiver may use a grab bar to assist with transferring a patient from one place to another. A worker may use a grab bar to hold on to as he or she climbs, or in case of a fall.”

Traditional fall prevention grab bars tend to be sturdy metal tubes attached to walls that people use for added support in spaces with potential hazards.

How do grab bars help prevent falls?

There are 3 main ways grab bars help prevent falls:

  • Providing support for balance: If you have trouble balancing, holding onto a grab bar can help you maintain your balance and reduce fatigue while standing.
  • Providing support during transfers: A transfer is any change of position. Some common examples include getting on or off the toilet, or in and out of the bath. As people age, it’s normal for these types of transfers to become more difficult. A well-placed grab bar can make transfers easier and safer.
  • Providing a fail-safe: As a last resort, a grab bar can prevent a fall in progress by giving you something to grab onto before you hit the floor.

Why you might need grab bars

Here’s a not-so-radical truth: everyone gets older. As we age, our bodies change and certain activities become more challenging. 

Regardless of your age, you’ve probably experienced changes to your level of ability at some point. Maybe you’ve broken bones and been temporarily in a cast. Perhaps after a lot of driving, you’ve had back pain so bad you couldn’t move.

Photo by Elevate via Pexels

The point, here, is that all of us have been in situations where the regular tasks we take for granted become more difficult or dangerous. In these situations, having grab bars for extra support could be the difference between staying safe and suffering a fall. 

The epidemic of falls

They’re not talked about enough, but falls are a huge problem that affect everyone.

According to a 2014 study by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries among adults aged 65 and older. Approximately one third of seniors have a fall each year, but less than half tell their doctor. Worse, a person’s risk of falling doubles if they’ve fallen once before.

If you’re under 65, you might not think you need to worry about falls, but their impacts are far-reaching. 

Falls place a tremendous financial burden on the medical system. In the US in 2015, the total medical costs for falls were over $50 billion. These statistics are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to falls, and they don’t account for the long-term impact family members endure when their loved ones fall. 

The worst part is that falls are very preventable, but because of stigma and shame, people are reluctant to accept safety solutions like grab bars.

Photo of Scrabble game tiles spelling out the word 'shame' on a bright red background.

Photo by Anna Tarazevich via Pexels

The stigma around grab bars

Before we go any further, let’s think about some safety solutions that are widely accepted. We use seatbelts when driving, handrails on stairs, and helmets when cycling—so why is it so hard for us to accept grab bars in wet, slippery bathrooms?

In reality, the stigma around grab bars is just part of the stigma around aging and disability. Engineer and occupational therapist Rebecca Langbein sums this up in a fall 2020 interview:

“There’s no denying we live in an ageist world. We’re taught from the time we’re really little, “enjoy life when you’re young; everything gets worse when you get older!”

Even though aging and the changes that it brings are pretty much universal, they are seen in a negative light, so anything that draws attention to them (like grab bars) might be difficult to accept.

Traditional grab bars (and a lot of other safety products) also have a reputation for looking very clinical. In addition to feeling ashamed about your age or level of ability, you probably don’t want products in your home that make it look like a hospital.

Beyond the stigma around aging, disability, and grab bars—people tend to feel embarrassed about asking for help or support in general. In western culture, self-sufficiency is seen as one of the highest virtues. As a result, asking for help is seen as a weakness.

Photo by Roman Carey via Pexels

This belief in fierce independence can be toxic in a lot of ways, but in the context of grab bars, it’s just ironic. 

If we all felt less shame about aging, disability, and safety, maybe we’d see grab bars and safety products become standard fixtures everywhere. Maybe it wouldn’t be so scary to ask for the support we need. As a result, maybe we’d all be able to stay independent and self-sufficient for longer. 

Proactively installing grab bars (and overcoming the stigma)

It’s natural that you might feel ashamed about your changing needs, but you shouldn’t have to. If we’re lucky enough to live to old age, all of us will deal with varying needs—and that’s okay!

What’s important is that whatever your needs (or the needs of your loved ones), you’re able to live with comfort and dignity without worrying about your safety. Even if you feel like it’s too soon to install grab bars, taking a proactive approach has several benefits.

First, your home will be safer for everyone. If you have older friends and family who visit you or share your space, having grab bars will ensure their comfort and safety in your home.

Photo of a young woman embracing her elderly father in an outdoor gazebo.

Photo by Rodnae Productions via Pexels

Another benefit to installing grab bars before you need them is that you won’t ever be in a rush to install them in reaction to a fall or injury.   

Finally, you (and your loved ones) won’t have to worry about your safety long-term. You can have peace of mind that your space will work for you as you age, and you’ll probably be able to avoid some difficult conversations about safety. If you feel embarrassed talking about this, installing safety products means you won’t have to. 

Even if you don’t choose to install grab bars in your home right now, you should understand why it’s an important step. We hope that once you feel ready, that understanding makes your decision easier.

Stay tuned for future articles to help you know what to look for when you buy grab bars.

Micah Rakoff Bellman is a content creator at HealthCraft Group. An enthusiastic problem solver, human-centered designer, and storyteller—he’s passionate about understanding people to help them live better.
4 minute read
Close-up photo of wet, turquoise shower tiles covered in water droplets alluding to the importance of bathroom safety.
9 minute read
Photo of a man in a wheelchair with his child in his lap sitting in front of a laptop computer.
8 minute read
Photo of a young man walking next to an older woman using a walker.
7 minute read
Photo of an old man with a beard wearing a hat with a brim and leather gloves seated on public transit.
6 minute read
Photo of two young girls playing chess with their grandfather.
7 minute read
Photo of an old man teaching a young girl to play billiards.
8 minute read
Photo of an elderly man's hands clasped together on top of a cane.
11 minute read
Photo of a middle-aged man and woman standing at an island countertop in a kitchen enjoying a glass of wine. The man is holding onto a HealthCraft SuperPole with his left hand.
10 minute read
Photo of Kyla Cullain; a woman with light brown hair in a sleeveless black dress.
9 minute read
Photo of a bearded man in a wheelchair sitting next to his dining table reading with a HealthCraft SuperPole to his left.
15 minute read
Photo of a woman staring off into the distance in thought while using a laptop.
12 minute read
Photo showing the base of a HealthCraft SuperPole being installed by a hand holding a screwdriver.
25 minute read

Next stop - newsletter.

Sign up for monthly tips, stories, and exclusive deals. 

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Thank you for subscribing!

Check your email for our first correspondence